New Meeting Venue Announced for 2019

January 27th, 2019

New for 2019! Our monthly meetings are now held at Harrison Park, Hall Road, Hull. HU69DQ. On the 3rd Sunday of each month.

For more information on our face to face meet ups >>>> Our Meetings


 

Local Mum Hayley’s Quest for a Physiological Twin Home Birth

March 31st, 2018

Newly added Birth Story!

“Born 10th March carried to 40+8
Tobias 8lb 3oz
Maximus 7lb 8oz

On Saturday 10th March 18 I woke up at 6.45 am having a few niggly pains. I asked hubby to take the girls downstairs so I could have time alone to see what came of them. I was 40+8 and hour later I knew this was definitely labour. Hubby took kids to grandmas and I phoned my independent midwife (who is over an hour away) . I know my body pretty well now and always go into urinary retention in labour which slows me down and distress me. I got in bath to relax then when got out put in my tens machine . Debs my midwife got here around 10.30 . She helped me get some urine out and checked I was 6cm. Pool was ready now and I got in . It was heaven. I love being in water. The rest of the amazing Yorkshire Storks midwives turned up . Then at 12.03 twin A Tobias was born at home weighing a healthy 8lbs 3oz It was a surreal and fantastic experience. We had some skin to skin in the pool , our first breastfeed and waited for cord to stop pulsing, I was still getting contractions for twin 2 and felt quite conflicted on what to concentrate on. So cord was cut and he went to daddy for skin to skin.”

To read the full story >>>> Hayley’s Birth Story


 

Maternity Voices Partnership is coming to Hull!

January 27th, 2018

Something exciting is happening next week! Hull is getting it’s very own Maternity Voices Partnership (MVP).

Are you pregnant? Have you had a baby in the last two years. Then, we'd like to get your views.We're holding a…

Posted by Hull Women and Children's Hospital on Thursday, 25 January 2018

So what does this mean?

What is a Maternity Voices Partnership (MVP)?

NCT (1) define it as a multi-disciplinary group, of ‘parents working in partnership with midwives, doctors, other health professionals and charity reps [to] directly help improve future care to women, partners and babies using hospitals, birth centres and community services. MVPs will also be chaired by a ‘service user representative’.

Is it a new?

No not exactly. National Maternity Voices (2) explain further that ‘Maternity Voices Partnerships (MVPs) are an innovative development based on an updating of Maternity Services Liaison Committees (MSLCs)’. Multi disciplinary maternity services meetings have been taking place for a long time, but although attendees may have come from both public sector and voluntary organisations, service users weren’t always regularly involved.

So why now?

Following the release of the National Maternity Review  ‘Better Births: Improving outcomes of maternity services in England’ (3) in February 2016, a resource pack (4) was made available to help maternity services implement the recommendations made. ‘Effective service user co-production’ was suggested, recommending the ‘establishment of independent formal multidisciplinary committees, … [called] “Maternity Voices Partnerships” (formerly MSLCs), to influence and share in local decision-making’.

What are the Better Births (3) Recommendations?

7 recommendations were made:

1. Personalised care, centred on the woman, her baby and her family, based around their needs and their decisions, where they have
genuine choice, informed by unbiased information.

2. Continuity of carer, to ensure safe care based on a relationship of mutual trust and respect in line with the woman’s decisions.

3. Safer care, with professionals working together across boundaries to ensure rapid referral, and access to the right care in the right place; leadership for a safety culture within and across organisations; and investigation, honesty and learning when things go wrong.

4. Better postnatal and perinatal mental health care, to address the historic underfunding and provision in these two vital areas, which can have a significant impact on the life chances and wellbeing of the woman, baby and family.

5. Multi-professional working, breaking down barriers between midwives, obstetricians and other professionals to deliver safe and personalised care for women and their babies.

6. Working across boundaries to provide and commission maternity services to support personalisation, safety and choice, with access to specialist care whenever needed.

7. A payment system that fairly and adequately compensates providers for delivering high quality care to all women efficiently, while supporting commissioners to commission for personalisation, safety and choice.

How can I get involved?

If you are pregnant or have had a baby in the last 2 years and would like to help shape the future of Maternity Care Services, or feel very passionate about improving Maternity Care, just telephone the number on the advert above to confirm your place at the event at Rock Up on Tuesday 30th January 2018. If you are unable to make it, keep a look out for further information on how you can get involved!


References

(1) https://www.nct.org.uk/professional/mslcs

(2) http://nationalmaternityvoices.org.uk/

(3) https://www.england.nhs.uk/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/national-maternity-review-report.pdf

(4) https://www.england.nhs.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/nhs-guidance-maternity-services-v1.pdf

 

I often hear ‘A Home Birth? How brave!’ Giving birth at home is not brave. Lets look at how monkey mama does it – a cartoon by Cartoon Kate

August 8th, 2017

I often hear ‘A Home Birth? How brave!’ Giving birth is not brave, it’s normal.

This cartoon about birth explains how the process works and is designed to entertain and to inspire.

Continued at …….. Birth: How monkey mama does it – Cartoon Kate

If you like this please check out the rest of the book ‘Bump – How to make, grow and birth a baby – By Kate Evans

Home Births and Breastfeeding

July 30th, 2017

 

I half expected our first breastfeed to be like a scene out of Snow White

I planned my home birth meticulously, right down to what snacks I would have on offer for our visiting midwives. An area that I did neglect when putting together my birth plan, however, was breastfeeding. Call me naive or maybe overly optimistic, but with my rose tinted glasses on I half expected our first breastfeed to be like a scene out of Snow White.

his first ever feed was not from me!

When my baby boy arrived in August 2015 at 38 weeks I was presented with the opposite, my beautiful baby just didn’t know what to do and I had very little knowledge to help guide him. The Midwives did their best to help me but nobody could get my baby to latch, and due to some minor concerns surrounding his blood sugars his first ever feed was not from me! Our breastfeeding journey definitely had a rough start but I am pleased to say almost 2 years on we are still going strong!

If I were to plan my home birth again…

If I were to plan my home birth again, I would definitely dedicate an area on my birth plan to breastfeeding. I would also attend the one off breastfeeding session held at our local hospital (I attended this over a year later as a volunteer and found it so informative!). Another thing I would do is gather information on who can help if required. Looking at our local breastfeeding support there are 3 main types; NHS, Voluntary and Private.

Who can help?

  • NHS

    • Midwives

    • Health Visitors

    • Infant Feeding Specialists  –

      Hospital (referral via Midwife/Breastfeeding Support)
      Community (referral via Health Visitor/Breastfeeding Support)
  • Voluntary

  • Private – 

Other  helpful contacts are:

  • National Breastfeeding Helpline – Offering independent, confidential, mother-centred, non-judgmental breastfeeding support and information

  • Breastfeeding Network – Who offer a unique Drugs in Breastmilk line for mums and health professionals as well as support

  • KellyMom – Evidence based information on breastfeeding and parenting

  • iBreastfeed – An NHS Hull campaign to give parents in Hull the information and confidence to choose to breastfeed

  • Breastbuddies – A social media support group

One of the benefits of having a home birth is that you get to stay in the comfort of your own home, a slight negative of this though is not being able to press a buzzer when you need some help. Knowing the basics of how to latch your baby is valuable, as is knowing the signs that breastfeeding is going well.

Knowing the basics

I can not emphasise enough what a helpful guide this is: http://kellymom.com/hot-topics/newborn-nursing/, all mums to be should read it!!

Goodwin Support at home

Lastly, did you know that home birthing mums in Hull (HU1 – HU9) are able to access Goodwin Breastfeeding Support home visits? For further details please contact: Caroline Wiggins, Breastfeeding Peer Support Coordinator at Fenchurch Street Children’s Centre on (01482) 497800. Or email Caroline: cwiggins@goodwintrust.org.